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Monthly Archives: December 2016

John Salmon “RIP” Ford, Texas Ranger

ripford

John Salmon Ford was born in 1815 in South Carolina.  His family later moved to Shelbyville, Tennessee where he studied medicine.  Ford came to Texas shortly after the Battle of San Jacinto, arriving in June of 1836.  One of his first memories in Texas was to attend a Forth of July celebration in San Augustine in which Sam Houston was honored.  Houston was still suffering from his wounded leg, but he gave a rousing speech.  Ford joined the  Texas Army and served until about 1838 under Col. Jack Hays, participating in many Indian battles.  He then set up a medical practice in San Augustine which he operated until about 1844.  During this time, he also studied law and passed the bar exam.  In 1844, he won an election and began serving in the Texas House.  It was Ford who introduced the resolution for Texas Annexation by the United States.

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Posted by on December 29, 2016 in biography, history, texas, texas rangers

 

Pegasus

pegasus

(Image credit: American Oil and Gas Historical Society)

This is a well known image most likely to every American who is at least 40 years old.  For decades, it was the trademark of Mobil gas stations and other Mobilgas products and facilities.  Prior to 1911, the Standard Oil Company was the largest oil company in the world.  It was founded by John D. Rockefeller in 1863 as the Standard Oil Trust and within a few years it had become a company that dominated the oil industry in the United States.  The Sherman Antitrust Act of 1890 was enacted to help prevent monopolies from controlling too much of the U. S. economy.  The Standard Oil Company was declared a monopoly under the Act and was ordered by the U. S. Supreme Court to break itself up into seven different “state” companies in 1911, similar to the action that was required of AT&T several decades later.

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Posted by on December 22, 2016 in history, oil and gas, texas

 

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Peters Colony

Under the rule of Spain and later Mexico, there were a number of empressario grants made, including Austin’s Colony, Dewitt’s, DeLeon’s, Edwards’ and McMullen and McGloin.  These grants were primarily located in the southern portion of the area, inland from the gulf coast.  A similar empressario system was enacted by the Republic of Texas to encourage settlement in the northern part of the Republic.  One of these grants was to W. S. Peters and his associates and was signed by President Mirabeau B. Lamar in 1841.

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Posted by on December 15, 2016 in history, texas

 

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Y.O. Ranch

This famous ranch was founded by Charles Armand Schreiner, who was born in 1838 in Alsace-Lorraine, an area that lay between Germany and France.  He came to the still young United States of America with his parents and family in 1852, settling in Bexar County.  In an unexpected turn of events, both of his parents died shortly thereafter.  His father Gustav passed as the result of a rattlesnake bite within a year from their arrival, followed by his mother Charlotte’s death four years later.  His family was dispersed at that point, with his only sister getting married, one brother leaving for California to find gold and two other brothers remaining in San Antonio where they had found employment.

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Posted by on December 8, 2016 in biography, history, ranch families, texas

 

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Olive Oatman

 

oliveoatman

This haunting image is of Olive Ann Oatman Fairchild.  Olive was born in 1837 to a Mormon family, one of seven children of Royse and Mary Ann Oatman.  Royse had started raising his family in Illinois, briefly moved to Pennsylvania around 1849, and by 1850 had decided to join a wagon train of around 90 fellow believers to go west.

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Posted by on December 1, 2016 in biography, history, texas

 

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