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Category Archives: outlaws and crimes

Law Officers Killed by the Barrow Gang: Henry D. Humphrey (Victim Number 5)

The fifth law officer to be killed by the Barrow Gang was Town Marshal Henry D. Humphrey on June 22, 1933.  On July 30, 1933, the Sedalia (Missouri) Democrat and Capital ran an Associated Press article that began as follows, “Hubert Bleigh, 26, alias Herbert Blythe, of Tulsa, faced murder charges at Van Buren, Ark, five miles from here, tonight after he was brought to Van Buren by Sheriff Albert Maxey of Crawford County, from Oklahoma City.  Bleigh waived extradition.”  Bleigh was charged with the slaying of town marshal Henry G. Humphrey of Alma, Arkansas on the night of June 23, 1933.

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Posted by on October 17, 2019 in bonnie and clyde, outlaws and crimes

 

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Doc Goodnight and the Goodnight Gang

The Goodnight Gang was a name given to a group of outlaws operating in East and Central Texas headed up by William E. “Doc” Goodnight.  Members of the group included Goodnight, Hugh Merrick, J. R. Willis and J. H. Johnson according to various newspaper accounts.  They were by reputation robbers and the crimes mostly attributed to them involved the theft of cash from local individuals.  There was a legend that William E. Goodnight was somehow related to rancher Charles Goodnight of North Texas, but we can find no obvious connection after looking into Charles Goodnight’s extended family.  Perhaps coincidentally, Charles Goodnight had a number of relatives in Illinois and the State of Illinois appears to also figure into Doc Goodnight’s early history.

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Posted by on October 3, 2019 in outlaws and crimes, unsolved mystery

 

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Hoodoo War

The Hoodoo War was the common name for the Mason County War, which took place in the middle 1870s in the area and arose over the killing and rustling of cattle.  This was typified by attacks from vigilantes wearing masks to conceal their identities and to generate terror.  These vigilantes essentially took the law into their own hands in an effort to defend against the alleged perpetrators.

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Posted by on August 1, 2019 in outlaws and crimes, texas rangers

 

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The Horrell Brothers

In the latter half of the 1870s in Lampasas County, Texas a feud developed between two families, the Horrells and the Higgins.  Prior to that, the Horrell brothers, Mart, Tom, Merritt, Ben and Sam, had come to the attention of state law enforcement officers.  In early 1873, during a short period when the Texas Rangers had been disbanded by the federal government, the Horrells were involved in a several incidents.  In place of the former Texas Ranger force, reconstruction Governor Edmund J. Davis promoted a state police force around 1870 to be positioned in authority over all state-wide and local law enforcement.  This was on the heels of the end of the Civil War and the emphasis was to be inclusive of non-white lawmen when selecting officers, though some whites were also hired.  This led to race-related conflicts between the officers and the general population in addition to natural conflicts with criminal elements.  The Texas Rangers would later be reinstated in mid 1873.

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Posted by on July 4, 2019 in outlaws and crimes

 

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Belle Starr

Belle Starr, the famous “female outlaw” was born Myra Maybelle Shirley on February  5, 1848 to John and Elizabeth Shirley in rural Missouri near the town of Carthage.  It was a time when bandits, either male or female, were celebrated in some ways.  Her family lived on a farm.  Reportedly, they were also slave owners in a time when strong attitudes for or against slavery divided residents especially in so-called border states.  Her family later sold their rural property and moved into Carthage where they ran the inn and several other businesses.  The civil war came and a brother joined the Confederate army and more specifically the controversial outfit known as Quantrill’s Raiders.  Her brother Bud Shirley was killed in Missouri in a skirmish between Union and Confederate troops.  The economy had generally deteriorated in Missouri because of the war and the Shirleys packed up and moved to near Scyene, Texas, at the time located southeast of Dallas, around 1864.

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Posted by on April 4, 2019 in biography, outlaws and crimes, texas women

 

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Sheriff Pat Garrett’s Life in Texas

Sheriff Pat Garrett is best known for having killed the outlaw Billy the Kid in Fort Sumner, New Mexico.  He was born in Alabama in 1850 and moved with his family to Louisiana where they owned a plantation but their business was destroyed by the Civil War and his father died a few years after the war’s end.  Fewer people probably know that when he was younger, he spent some time working as a cowboy in the vicinity of Dallas, Texas.  He then went on to work on the LS Ranch out in the Panhandle area (now Oldham and Hartley counties).

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Posted by on November 22, 2018 in biography, outlaws and crimes

 

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Quantrill’s Raiders, Frank and Jesse James in North Texas

William Clarke Quantrill was known as a leader of a pro Confederate band of guerrillas during the Civil War.  He was born in Ohio in 1837.  By the age of sixteen, he had become employed as a school teacher in Ohio.  He was from a large family the father of which was reportedly abusive, but who died when Quantrill was still a young adult.  Quantrill left home when he was still under twenty and moved to Illinois where he was working in a rail yard.  He was involved in an altercation in which a man was killed, with Quantrill claiming self defense, but Quantrill was not charged with the killing due to a lack of evidence.  During the rest of the 1850s, Quantrill drifted between jobs and locations winding up in the state of Kansas by the end of the decade.  One of his jobs was to capture runaway slaves for bounties, which he was likely doing at the outset of the Civil War.  He formed a pro Confederate band of raiders having learned guerrilla tactics in other outfits.  His band included Frank and Jesse James, brothers Jim, Bob and Cole Younger, Archie Clement, William T. “Bloody Bill” Anderson and other individuals.

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Posted by on August 2, 2018 in biography, civil war, outlaws and crimes

 

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