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Category Archives: tribes and tribal leaders

Battle of the Knobs/Battle of Stone Houses

This battle took place in late 1837 in North Texas involving a group of Texas Rangers and a number of mostly Keeci Indians.  According to the various accounts, a Lt. Van Benthuysen was searching the area looking for some stolen horses.  After several  weeks of scouting, the Rangers encountered the Keeci (also spelled as Kichai and Keechi) at a place known for its appearance, mounds of rock described as rock teepees or rock houses.  According to all accounts, the Keeci outnumbered the Rangers several times over, with the Indians amounting to an estimated 150 and the Rangers numbering seventeen or eighteen.  The Rangers held out after losing four of their party.  Also during the battle, the Indians set off a ring of fire around the troops who escaped on foot through the smoke, but not until having lost ten men, over half their number.  Out of their eighteen, four were killed in the battle and six were killed during the escape.  They walked and foraged for ten days until reaching a friendly Kickapoo camp near the present city of Dallas where they stayed for a while before returning to safety near Houston.

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Posted by on February 8, 2018 in texas rangers, tribes and tribal leaders

 

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Buffalo Hump

Buffalo Hump was a formidable Comanche war chief, thought to have been born around 1790.  He lived until around 1870 and was one of the most influential Comanche leaders during his lifetime.  His native name was Pachanaquarship and he was a respected leader among the Comanche tribe almost his entire adult life.  His band were called the Penetekas which is roughly translated “honey eaters” and though they ranged widely in Texas, they spent a considerable amount of time in the general area that is now Abilene.

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Posted by on December 21, 2017 in biography, tribes and tribal leaders

 

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Battle of the Neches

chiefbowles

(Image credit: TexasCherokeeNation.org)

On July 16, 1839, the last major battle between Texas forces and the Cherokee tribe along with other tribal bands took place.  The Cherokee had first come to Texas shortly after the turn of the century, long before the Texas Revolution, and had settled near the Red River.  Much of the time thereafter, their leader was Chief John Bowles, pictured in the image above, also known as Diwal’li.  There are other variations of his name, but we will refer to him as Chief Bowles.  The Chief was thought to have been born around 1756 to a Cherokee mother and a Scotch-Irish father.  He is said to have had the features of both parents including reddish hair, Cherokee features and freckled skin.

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Posted by on May 18, 2017 in sam houston, tribes and tribal leaders

 

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Satanta, Kiowa Chief

Satanta, or Settiante (White Bear), was a Kiowa war chief.  Born around 1820, the son of Chief Red Tipi and a Spanish captive, he was similar the Comanche leader Quanah Parker, in that he was a formidable warrior and has been called the last great chief of his tribe.

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Posted by on June 16, 2016 in biography, tribes and tribal leaders

 

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Quanah Parker

Quanah Parker is thought to have been born around 1850, although his exact date of birth is unrecorded, and he died in 1911. He was the son of Chief Peta Nocona and Cynthia Ann Parker, who was taken captive by the Comanche during the Fort Parker Massacre in 1836 when she was 9 years old. Cynthia lived most of her adult life with the tribe and at the time of her recapture in 1860 had become virtually assimilated into the culture and the tribe. The circumstances of the battle which resulted in her recapture are debated, with Texas Ranger Sul Ross having claimed to have killed Peta Nocona while others claimed that Nocona was not at the battle. However, it is agreed that Cynthia was recaptured at the battle and that Quanah escaped and was captured later, at another location.

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Posted by on January 14, 2016 in biography, tribes and tribal leaders

 

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Nocona, Texas

Nocona, Texas (coordinates: 33°47′18″N 97°43′35″W) is located in Montague County and was named for Peta Nocona, a famous Comanche warrior and chief.  It was founded about 1887 and was the last stop on the Chisolm Trail before its the cattle drives came to the Red River on their way from Texas ranches to railheads in Kansas.

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