RSS

Dan Waggoner and His Descendants

Daniel Waggoner was born in 1828 in Tennessee to Solomon and Martha McGaugh Waggoner.  Daniel was the second of the siblings to be born in Lincoln County, Tennessee before the family moved to Missouri where most of the other siblings were born.  The family finally settled in Hopkins County, Texas.  Daniel married  Nancy Moore in 1851 in Hopkins County.  About that same time, the couple moved to Wise County, Texas. The following year their only son William Thomas Waggoner was born.  Nancy passed away in 1853.  Five years later, Daniel married Sicily Ann Halsell, daughter of Electious and  Elizabeth Jane Mayes Halsell.  Sicily was from a large ranching family, also of Wise County.  The couple had no children.

Daniel operated cattle ranches in at least two successive locations in Wise County and around 1869, he and his son William Thomas (W. T. or Tom) Waggoner formed a partnership that would become the basis for the Waggoner Ranch.  The family story is that the capital for this partnership came from a successful cattle drive of 6,000 head to Kansas that the Waggoners made around 1866.  The Waggoners began to acquire and claim land along the Red River in North Texas.

The ranch amounted to over 500,000 acres by the time of the Great Depression in the United States.  During the Depression, they managed to survive the poor economic situation and expanded the ranch to include 180,000 acres in eastern New Mexico. The brand was composed of three reverse capital D letters and later also adopted one reverse capital D.

Tom married a younger sister of Sicily Ann Halsell, Ella Halsell.  Ella was about seventeen years younger than Sicily Ann, and was born in 1859, roughly a year after Sicily and Dan were married.  The Halsell name was a very familiar one to Wise County.  They had a very large family and were spread out from Wise County to beyond.

Daniel Waggoner died in September of 1904.  Sicily survived him by about twenty-four years and died in 1928.  Both are buried in Oaklawn Cemetery in Decatur.  In 1909, Tom Waggoner conveyed half of the ranch to their three surviving children, Paul, Guy and Electra and about fourteen years later, all the land interests were combined and conveyed into a trust that owned and operated it for the next ninety years or so.  Tom Waggoner died in 1934 at age 82 and Ella survived him another twenty-five years before she passed away in 1959 at the age of 100.  Both are buried in Oaklawn Cemetery in Fort Worth.

The family’s continuous possession of the land proved to be a valuable asset.  Over the years they ran a successful cow and calf operation with various different breeds of cattle.  The also branched out into raising horses, including work horses and race horses.  Oil was discovered after 1900.

Tom and Ella had five children but three of them lived to adulthood, as noted above.  Electra was born on the family ranch in Decatur in 1882.  She studied abroad and was first married to Albert Buckman Wharton of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1902.  The couple had two sons.  Her second husband was Joseph Weldon Bailey and her third husband was James Gilmore, whom she married shortly before she died awaiting surgery in New York in 1925 at age 43.  Electra was the namesake of Electra, Texas.  Her remains were removed to Fort Worth where she is buried in Oakwood Cemetery.

Guy Leslie Waggoner was born in 1883, in Decatur.  He was married to Katherine Frances Brown, Lucille Eads Elliott, Dorothy Katherine Weaver, Anne Valiant Burnett (granddaughter of Samuel Burk Burnett, founder of the 6666 Ranch), Anne Belle Stinnett and Virginia Joan Green.  Guy Leslie lived on the ranch or in nearby Vernon over the years.  He had a strong interest in horse racing and was at various times chairman of both the Texas Racing Commission and the New Mexico Racing Commission.  In New Mexico, he acquired the Bell Ranch in Eastern New Mexico.  He died in 1950 of a heart ailment and is buried in Oakwood Cemetery in Fort Worth.

E. Paul Waggoner was born in 1889.  In 1910, Paul married the former Helen Buck, daughter of a Sherman, Texas cotton buyer.  Their daughter, named Electra Waggoner after her aunt, married John Biggs.  Biggs and several other inlaws and grandchildren were involved in the management of the ranch over the years, in addition to talented-non family members.

A familiar story in Texas, oil was discovered on the ranch in 1903 while drilling for water.  Commercial petroleum production began a few years later.  The basic breed of cattle over the years has been Hereford, but other breeds have been introduced, including Longhorn, Brangus, Simbrah, Angus and Brahma.  As of the 1990s it amounted to around 550,000 acres in parts of about six counties in Texas.  The ranch is no longer owned by heirs of Dan Waggoner.  It was sold to a single owner in 2016 after years of litigation among descendants in the family.  The sale signaled the end of an era, but left strong memories for North Texas families who either lived on the ranch or were somehow connected to some aspect of the operation in business over the years.

© 2020, all rights reserved.

 

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on February 20, 2020 in ranches, ranch families

 

Tags: , ,

Law Officers Killed By The Barrow Gang: Cal Campbell (Victim 9)

Constable Cal Campbell was the last lawman to be killed by the Barrow gang.  The list of law officers who were victims of the gang is as follows:

Eugene Moore, Atoka, OK, 8/5/1932
Malcolm Davis, Dallas, TX 1/6/1933
Harry McGinnis, Joplin, MO 4/13/1933
Wes Harryman, Joplin, MO 4/13/1933
Henry D. Humphrey, Alma, AR 6/26/1933
Major Crowson, Huntsville, TX 1/16/1934
E. B. Wheeler, Grapevine, TX 4/1/1934
H. D. Murphy, Grapevine, TX 4/1/1934
Cal Campbell, Commerce, OK, 4/6/1934

Read the rest of this entry »

 
 

Tags: , , ,

The Lubbock Brothers

Three brothers figure into the history of Texas.  They are Thomas, Francis and Henry Lubbock.  Colonel Thomas Saltus Lubbock is the brother for whom Lubbock county and the city of Lubbock is named.  He was born in South Carolina in 1817 and came to Texas early enough to participate in the Siege of Bexar in late 1835.  He was also a participant in the ill-fated Santa Fe Expedition in 1841.  Thomas was captured in New Mexico while Texas troops were on their way to Santa Fe.  He was taken to Mexico and imprisoned, but was one of two individuals to be able to escape.  He later made his way back to Texas.  When the Civil War broke out, he first served in an irregular unit comprised mostly of former Texas soldiers and Texas Rangers as scouts for the Confederate Army.  He and some others later joined the Confederate Army and were founding members of “Terry’s Texas Rangers,” the 8th Texas Cavalry.  Lubbock was promoted to Colonel and put in command of the regiment after the death of Benjamin Franklin Terry but happened to be ill with typhoid fever at the time.  Thomas died the following day on January 9, 1862 before he could take command.  He is buried in Glenwood Cemetery in Houston, Texas.

Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on February 6, 2020 in biography, civil war, county names, town names

 

Tags: , , ,

NASA Comes to Texas

In the 1960s, the expansion of the United States space program was rightfully associated with President Kennedy.  However, it had begun during the presidential terms of President Eisenhower.  In January of 1960, President Eisenhower urged Congress to give a new civilian space agency full responsibility for the development of nonmilitary space exploration.  This article is intended to be an overview of the early days of the space program in Texas.  We would like to expand on this topic as we find more information.

Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on January 30, 2020 in space program

 

Tags: , ,

Jack Lummus, Medal of Honor Recipient

Jack Lummus was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions on the island of Iwo Jima during World War II.  According to a May, 1945 newspaper report based upon an interview with a fellow Marine, 1st Lt. Lummus was killed while leading an infantry and tank attack on the island on March 8, 1945.

Read the rest of this entry »

 
1 Comment

Posted by on January 23, 2020 in biography, heroes, medal of honor, world war 2

 

Tags: , , , , ,

Alvis Edgar “Buck” Owens, Jr.

Buck Owens was born Alvis Edgar Owens, Jr. to Alvis Edgar and Macie Owens in Sherman, Texas in 1929.  He is said to have given himself the nickname of Buck after his favorite mule (alternately said to be a donkey or a horse in different accounts) when he was young.  His father, Alvis Edgar, Sr., was a sharecropping farmer in Grayson County, Texas.  In 1937, the family moved west to Arizona.  The family legend is that their trailer broke down near Phoenix, Arizona where they had other relatives, so they elected to settle there.  Similar to the stories of many other musical artists, Buck’s mother sang and played the piano at their home and in church.  Buck learned to play the guitar, mandolin and other instruments when he was a youth.  He dropped out of school at age thirteen to help the family survive and did all sorts of jobs to raise money.  As a young man, Buck began performing in honky-tonks to earn his living.  When he was about twenty, he married his first wife, the former Bonnie Campbell, a singer in a band both she and Buck played in called Mac and the Skillet Lickers.  Buck and Bonnie eventually moved to Bakersfield, California where Buck began to play around town and in the surrounding area. Buck and Bonnie would remain married for about five years.  He was married three more times.

Read the rest of this entry »

 
3 Comments

Posted by on January 16, 2020 in biography, entertainers

 

Tags: , , , ,

Henry and Ivy Methvin

Ivan “Ivy” Terrell Methvin was born April 5, 1885 in Louisiana to Hamilton Terrell and Mary E. Barron Methvin.  Ivy was one of five children and their names all began with the letter I:  Iverson Victor (1876-1952), Izaarh (or possibly Isaiah, 1877- about 1894), Isaac (1879- about 1894), Idonia (the only sister, 1882-1910) and Ivy, all born in Louisiana.  In the 1880 census, Hamilton Methvin’s profession was listed as being a farmer.  In some listings, Izaarh and Isaac have the same years of birth and death, but in the 1880 census, Isaac is not quite one year old while Izaarh (possibly just a misreading of the written name) was at least one year older.  Of the children, Iverson survived the longest, living until 1952, working as a farmer for many years and later working as a cobbler of shoes in Louisiana.  Iverson and his wife Sarah Huggins Methvin had a large family.  The sister Idonia married a man named Campbell and had a small family before she passed away at around the age of 28 in Oklahoma. Hamilton Terrell Methvin died a about eighteen months after Ivy was born.

Read the rest of this entry »

 
1 Comment

Posted by on January 9, 2020 in biography, bonnie and clyde, outlaws and crimes

 

Tags: , , , ,