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Category Archives: town names

Juan Seguin

Juan Nepomucema Seguin was born in Spanish San Antonio on October 27, 1808 to Juan José Erasmo and María Josefa Becerra Seguin.  Erasmo was descended from one of sixteen families who came to the San Antonio area from the Canary Islands in the early 1700s.  The Seguin cattle ranch covered portions of three current Texas counties: Bexar, Guadalupe and Wilson.  Erasmo served as postmaster of San Antonio from 1807 to 1835, mayor (alcalde) of San Antonio from 1820-1821 and quartermaster of Presidio de San Antonio de Béxar from 1825 to 1835.  Erasmo was acquainted with Moses Austin who was succeeded by his son, Stephen F. Austin.  Along with Don Martin de Veramendi, Erasmo assisted them in obtaining their Austin Colony grant.

juanseguin

(Image credit: pbs.org)

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Petrolia, a Texas Boom Town

Petrolia is one of several Texas towns that sprang up during the Texas oil boom.  Petrolia took its name from an oil town in Pennsylvania.  It is located due east of Wichita Falls in Clay County, and succeeded a nearby settlement that was named Oil City.

PetroliaGusher1900

(Image credit: UNT Portal to Texas History)

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Posted by on November 2, 2017 in history, oil and gas, texas, town names

 

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Fort Stockton

Fort Stockton was originally an adobe fort built in 1859 by the United States Army as a means of protecting travelers, freighters and the mail service.  It was located near what was known as Comanche Springs, the source of Comanche Creek.  It served as a way point on the Old San Antonio Road, the Butterfield Overland Stage route and the Comanche Trail to Chihuahua, Mexico.

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Posted by on September 14, 2017 in forts, history, texas, texas forts, town names

 

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Samuel Maverick

mavericksketch

Samuel Augustus Maverick was born in the summer of 1803 in South Carolina to Samuel and Elizabeth Anderson Maverick.  His father operated an import business.  Young Samuel worked in the family business, graduating from Yale University in 1825.  He left the family business and moved to Virginia in 1828 to study law.  For a while he practiced law and in 1833 he moved to Georgia for a year before relocating to Alabama to operate a plantation that had been given to him by his father.

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Posted by on February 2, 2017 in biography, county names, texas, town names

 

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Mexia, Texas

Mexia is located in Limestone County in east central Texas.  It was founded in the 1800s and lies just north of Fort Parker with Groesbeck being the nearest town to the south of the fort.  Before the Anglo settlement began in the area, it was home to Native American tribes including the Comanche.

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Floyd County and Floydada, Texas

There are 254 counties in Texas and 11 of them are named for Alamo defenders: Bailey, Bowie, Cochran, Cottle, Crockett, Dickens, Floyd, King, Lynn, Taylor and Travis counties.  Floyd County is one such county.  It was named for Dolphin Ward Floyd who is believed to have died on his birthday, March 6, 1836, in Santa Anna’s attack on the Alamo.  Ward Floyd was born in North Carolina in 1804 and later moved near Gonzales where he worked as a farmer.  In 1832, he married the recently widowed Esther Berry House, a mother of three by her first husband Isaac House, who also lived in Texas.

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Collin McKinney

Collin McKinney was a early settler in North Texas.  He was born in 1766 in New Jersey to a Scottish couple, Daniel and Mercy McKinney, making him 10 years old at the height of the American Revolution.  Near the end of the war, the family first moved to Virginia and then again on to Kentucky around 1780.

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