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Charles Drake Ferris, Texas Ranger

Charles Drake “Charlie” Ferris was the son of Warren Angus Ferris, a surveyor who laid out the first streets of the old city of Dallas, Texas.  Back in 1917, Charlie Ferris was interviewed by a regional newspaper at his home near Capitan in Lincoln County, New Mexico.  Among other things, Charlie talked about the capture of two Texas outlaws, James Pitts and Charles Yeager.  According to his recollection, previously written up in the old Pennsylvania Grit, Ferris served as a Texas Ranger for about twenty years.

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Posted by on August 23, 2018 in Uncategorized

 

Old Red, the Dallas County Courthouse

The building now referred to as “Old Red” served as the Dallas County Courthouse from the late 1800s to the mid 1900s.  It was completed in 1892.  The first contracts were let around 1890.  Robert L. James secured the bid of $365,000 to be the contractor.  The original news release indicated that it was to be built of Little Rock granite and that construction would take two years.

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Posted by on August 20, 2018 in Uncategorized

 
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Japanese Balloon Bomb Project, reblogged from Pacific Paratrooper:

Avenging the Doolittle Raids – Project Fugo November 1944 – Young Japanese girls wore headbands that designated them as Special Attack Force members. Daily they would recite the Imperial Precepts for Soldiers and Sailors before they began a twelve-hour shift in a makeshift factory in Kokura, Japan. Here they were producing 40 foot balloons to […]

To see the entire post:  Japanese Balloon Bombs hit USA & Canada — Pacific Paratrooper

Japanese Balloon Bombs hit USA & Canada — Pacific Paratrooper

 
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Posted by on August 16, 2018 in Uncategorized

 

Dan Blocker

Dan Blocker was well known as an actor on the long running series, Bonanza.  He was born Bobby Dan Davis Blocker to Ora and Mary Davis Blocker in DeKalb, Texas in 1928.  He weighed 14 pounds at birth and is still believed to be the largest baby ever born in Bowie County, Texas.  After suffering the effects of the Great Depression, in 1934, the family moved to O’Donnell in West Texas, where his father ran a mercantile store.

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Posted by on June 28, 2018 in entertainers, Uncategorized

 

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Tex Ritter

Woodward Maurice “Tex” Ritter was born on January 12, 1905 to James Everett and Elizabeth Matthews Ritter of Murvaul, Texas, in Panola County about 10 miles south of Carthage.  He was the youngest of about nine children.  His first name is sometimes spelled “Woodard” but in one account it is related that he was named for Dr. S. A. Woodward, the doctor who delivered him.  Tex was the grandson of Benjamin Franklin Ritter, who had been brought to Texas as a baby in the early to mid 1830s from Tennessee.

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Posted by on April 26, 2018 in biography, entertainers, Uncategorized

 

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William Henry Huddle, artist

This coming weekend will mark the anniversary of San Jacinto Day.  In our mind’s eye, we can envision what that may have looked like, especially after visiting the San Jacinto Monument.  Some will also think of Henry Huddle.  His name may not be too familiar to many Texans, but most likely just about everyone might recognize at least one of his works.  San Jacinto Day is drawing near, and the painting called “The Surrender of Santa Anna” (pictured below) commemorates the famous battle.

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Posted by on April 19, 2018 in artists, biography, Uncategorized

 

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Texas State Bison Herd

Evil Intentions

(Image credit: Defenders of Wildlife)

Estimates of 20 million to 30 million bison, literally a “sea of brown,” roamed the plains of the United States as late as the 1800s.  It was not uncommon for travelers to have to stop for hours and sometimes days as herds of the big animals crossed their route.  The native tribes freely hunted them, depending upon their meat for food, their hides for clothing, for a medium of exchange, and for their use in building their habitat.  In a few decades, the shaggy animals were almost hunted and slaughtered to extinction.  As the state began to be inhabited by European settlers, the bison population sharply declined.  It is accepted that one of the reasons the over-harvesting of bison was condoned was that it made the native tribes’ lives more difficult, no longer having a plentiful source of bison to live on.  The bison were no match for the hunters and the big animals were allowed to dwindle down to possibly as few as 1,000 survivors by about 1890.

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Posted by on July 27, 2017 in Uncategorized

 

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