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The Old 300 and Family Ties

The Old 300 refers to settlers in Moses Austin and Stephen F. Austin’s colony in Texas.  Moses Austin petitioned the Spanish government to be allowed to settle in Texas in late 1820 and received his grant in early 1821.  Shortly thereafter, Moses Austin died in Missouri and his son Stephen F. Austin elected to replace his father in the arrangement.  This was later confirmed by the Spanish governor who formally recognized Stephen F. Austin as the person to succeed Moses and complete the grant.

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Posted by on May 5, 2016 in Uncategorized

 

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The Sniper Tree

On December 7, 1835, Ben Milam was killed by a Mexican sniper during the Siege of Béxar in which Mexican forces were driven from the San Antonio area.  After the battle, the Texas forces occupied the Alamo and surrounding areas, setting the stage for Gen. Santa Anna’s own siege to retake it several weeks later.

There is some speculation about the location of the actual tree that was used by the sniper, but it is traditionally thought to be in the center of the town as it then existed and close enough to provide a line of sight to the Veramendi Palace, located on the west side of the river.

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Posted by on March 10, 2016 in Uncategorized

 

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Happy New Year

This blog has been ongoing for exactly a year now.  Thank you all for taking the time to share our stories.  We’ll see you next year, Lord willing.

You have indicated that you like the variety of the weekly featured stories, also the unsolved mysteries, the real characters depicted in “Texas Rising” and most of all, the biographical sketches of those people who made the Lone Star State what it is today.

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Posted by on December 31, 2015 in Uncategorized

 

Dad’s Trip to the Texas Centennial State Fair, 1936

In September 1936, Dad was living in Alvord, Texas, on Hubbard Street at the edge of town. There were no house numbers back then, he recalls. His aunt Ovie and uncle Bunk who lived in Petrolia, Texas had made plans to take Dad and his cousin Jimmy to the state fair in Dallas. Dad was about 10 1/2 and Jimmy was about six months older. Uncle Bunk was a tailor and had a shop in Petrolia. Dad said that the night before, Uncle Bunk had driven his family down to Alvord to be ready to leave for Dallas the next morning.

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Posted by on October 1, 2015 in Uncategorized

 

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Concho Stage Station

What do US Senator William Blakley, Tom Braniff, the Butterfield Stage Line, University of Texas and Scottish Rite Hospital all have in common?  Answer: The Concho Stage Station.

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Posted by on August 20, 2015 in Uncategorized

 

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The Waco Suspension Bridge

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One of the most famous landmarks in Central Texas is the Waco Suspension Bridge in McLennan County.  Waco was founded on the banks of the Brazos River just below where it is joined by the Bosque River.  For years, the only crossing nearby was Shapley Ross’ ferry that connected what is now East Waco, connecting with the road extending to Dallas, to downtown Waco at the extension of Austin Avenue to the river, connecting a main route to Marlin.  It was also one of several Brazos River crossings of the famed Chisholm Trail. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on May 28, 2015 in Uncategorized

 

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