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Monthly Archives: August 2015

Light Crust Doughboys

doughboys

The Light Crust Doughboys are an American western swing band from the Lone Star State created in 1931 to promote Light Crust Flour and other products of Burrus Mill and Elevator Company in Saginaw, Texas, a suburb of Ft. Worth.  The original group was formed by the company president, W. Lee O’Daniel and performed until about 1942.  During this period they began a radio broadcast on KFJZ in Ft. Worth and the show would open with the announcer saying “The Light Crust Doughboys are on the air!”  After the first couple of weeks, O’Daniel wanted to cancel the show, but its early popularity encouraged him to continue the broadcast and it came a popular stable at noon each weekday.  This is a YouTube link to a 1934 recording of the group’s theme song.

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Posted by on August 27, 2015 in history, texas

 

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Concho Stage Station

What do US Senator William Blakley, Tom Braniff, the Butterfield Stage Line, University of Texas and Scottish Rite Hospital all have in common?  Answer: The Concho Stage Station.

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Posted by on August 20, 2015 in history, texas

 

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Butterfield Stage Line

Approximate route of the Butterfield Overland Stage though Texas

Special credit to Steven Craig.

 

The Butterfield Overland Mail Trail ran from about 1858 to 1861 on a route that began in either Memphis or St. Louis and terminated in San Francisco carrying passengers and U. S. Mail.  It began with the Overland Mail Expedition, which was a test of the route in January of 1858 and took about 25 days.  Ultimately, the same general route was authorized by then Postmaster General Aaron Brown to deliver the U. S. Mail.  Prior to this, mail was shipped from the Gulf of Mexico to Panama, freighted across Panama and shipped on to San Francisco and other west coast destinations or shipped around South America.

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Posted by on August 13, 2015 in biography, history, texas

 

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Unsolved mystery? Jesse James’ gravesite

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The  outlaw Jesse Woodson James (1847-1882) is generally thought to have been shot and killed by Robert Ford on April 3, 1882.  Ford, a James gang member, reportedly shot James, then 34 years old, in the back of the head at the Kearney, Missouri home of Ford’s sister as they prepared to head out for another robbery.  Ford’s motive was to obtain a reward. Ford and his brother pled guilty to murder but were pardoned by the Missouri governor Thomas Crittendon. Although James body was identified and buried in Kearney, Missouri,  alternative accounts persist that he somehow faked his death and moved to Texas. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on August 6, 2015 in folklore, history, outlaws, texas, unsolved mystery

 

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