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Japanese Balloon Bomb Project, reblogged from Pacific Paratrooper:

Avenging the Doolittle Raids – Project Fugo November 1944 – Young Japanese girls wore headbands that designated them as Special Attack Force members. Daily they would recite the Imperial Precepts for Soldiers and Sailors before they began a twelve-hour shift in a makeshift factory in Kokura, Japan. Here they were producing 40 foot balloons to […]

To see the entire post:  Japanese Balloon Bombs hit USA & Canada — Pacific Paratrooper

Japanese Balloon Bombs hit USA & Canada — Pacific Paratrooper

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Posted by on August 16, 2018 in Uncategorized

 

Ben McCulloch

Benjamin McCulloch was one of twelve children.  He was born November 11, 1811 in Rutherford County, Tennessee to Alexander and Frances Fisher Lenoir McCulloch.  His father was a graduate of Yale College and served in the United States Army in Indian campaigns and also the War of 1812.  The family migrated west from the eastern coastal states.  Ben is thought to have first pursued some other businesses and moved around a lot until he came to Texas in 1835 with another brother and Davy Crockett, a neighbor, in Tennessee.  Ben planned to meet up with Crockett and then head from Nacogdoches to San Antonio but was held up as he recuperated from a case of the measles, not arriving in San Antonio until after the Battle of the Alamo.  He joined Sam Houston and the Texas Army in time for the Runaway Scrape, Houston’s retreat from Santa Anna.

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Quantrill’s Raiders, Frank and Jesse James in North Texas

William Clarke Quantrill was known as a leader of a pro Confederate band of guerrillas during the Civil War.  He was born in Ohio in 1837.  By the age of sixteen, he had become employed as a school teacher in Ohio.  He was from a large family the father of which was reportedly abusive, but who died when Quantrill was still a young adult.  Quantrill left home when he was still under twenty and moved to Illinois where he was working in a rail yard.  He was involved in an altercation in which a man was killed, with Quantrill claiming self defense, but Quantrill was not charged with the killing due to a lack of evidence.  During the rest of the 1850s, Quantrill drifted between jobs and locations winding up in the state of Kansas by the end of the decade.  One of his jobs was to capture runaway slaves for bounties, which he was likely doing at the outset of the Civil War.  He formed a pro Confederate band of raiders having learned guerrilla tactics in other outfits.  His band included Frank and Jesse James, brothers Jim, Bob and Cole Younger, Archie Clement, William T. “Bloody Bill” Anderson and other individuals.

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Posted by on August 2, 2018 in biography, civil war, outlaws and crimes

 

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Sara T. Hughes

Sara Augusta Tilghman Hughes was a pioneer in the legal profession.  She was born in 1896 in Baltimore, Maryland to James Cooke and Elizabeth Haughton Tilghman.  Her father was a shipping clerk in the dry goods business.  She grew up in Baltimore where she attended Western Female High School, Salem Academy in North Carolina and then Goucher College, graduating in 1917 with a degree in biology.  After graduating from college, she taught school for two years before enrolling in night law school classes at George Washington School of Law.  During the day, she worked as a police officer in Washington, D. C. and she received her law degree in 1922.

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“Cactus Jack” Garner

John Nance Garner was born in a log cabin near Detroit, now in Red River County, Texas in 1868 to John Nance III (1834-1919) and Sarah Jane Guest (1850-1932) Garner.  He was the first of about a dozen children.  He attended law school at Vanderbilt University in Tennessee, but did not graduate.  In those days, it was common to serve as an apprentice to another lawyer and then sit for the Texas bar exam.  Jack Garner passed the bar exam and set up a law practice in Uvalde, Texas where he met his future wife, Ettie Rheiner.  A life long Democrat, Garner was elected county judge in 1893 and five years later elected as state representative.

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Posted by on July 19, 2018 in biography

 

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Battleship Texas (BB-35)

The USS Texas is now berthed near the San Jacinto Monument.  She is second of the New York ship class, which consisted of only two ships, the USS New York and the USS Texas.  The New York Class (1908-1914) was characterized as being more heavily armed than the previous Wyoming Class.  They were the first battleships to use 14 inch/45 caliber guns.  This particular gun was used on the Nevada- and Pennsylvania Class ships.  The ships of the New York Class were also powered by coal and had five gun turrets when first built.  Some of the above was changed during overhauls and retrofitting, including her conversion from coal to diesel power.

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Posted by on July 12, 2018 in maritime, world war 2

 

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Benajah Harvey Carroll

Benajah Harvey Carroll was born in Mississippi to Benajah and Mary Eliza Mallard Carroll in 1843.  The family was of Irish descent with B. H.’s great grandfather having been born in Ireland.  The Carrolls moved first to Arkansas before settling in Burleson County, Texas near Caldwell in the late 1850s.  He was known in his family as a reader and his brother Dr. J. M. Carroll recalled that on the trip to Texas, Benajah would ride a mule while reading a book.  He often would get ahead of the wagons and come to a place to stop for the night.  When his family arrived, Carroll would have built a large fire and would be sitting beside it, reading.

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Posted by on July 5, 2018 in biography, civil war