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Author Archives: Texoso

Bass Reeves, Lawman

Bass Reeves was a groundbreaking lawman in the West.  Most people who know his name would be aware that he was born a slave and became a respected law officer mostly in the area that became Oklahoma, long before it became a state.

Reeves was born into slavery in 1838 in Crawford County, Arkansas on the property of former Arkansas state legislator, William Steele Reeves.  His last name was that of the owner William Reeves and his first name is believed to have been in honor of a grandfather by the name of Bass Washington.

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Posted by on October 31, 2019 in biography, black history

 

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Fort Mason

Fort Mason was established and vacated before the Civil War.  It was set up by Brevet Lt. Col. W. H. Harvey in the summer of 1851 and housed the Second Dragoons.  It was named for Second Lt. George T. Mason of the Second Dragoons, killed during the early days of the Mexican-American War in South Texas in 1846.  It has also been suggested that the fort could have been named for General Richard Barnes Mason who had died more recently, but most sources favor George T. Mason, a West Point graduate and native of Virginia.

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Posted by on October 24, 2019 in forts

 

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Law Officers Killed by the Barrow Gang: Henry D. Humphrey (Victim Number 5)

The fifth law officer to be killed by the Barrow Gang was Town Marshal Henry D. Humphrey on June 22, 1933.  On July 30, 1933, the Sedalia (Missouri) Democrat and Capital ran an Associated Press article that began as follows, “Hubert Bleigh, 26, alias Herbert Blythe, of Tulsa, faced murder charges at Van Buren, Ark, five miles from here, tonight after he was brought to Van Buren by Sheriff Albert Maxey of Crawford County, from Oklahoma City.  Bleigh waived extradition.”  Bleigh was charged with the slaying of town marshal Henry G. Humphrey of Alma, Arkansas on the night of June 23, 1933.

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Frank Buck

frank_buck

(Image credit – findagrave.com)

Frank Howard Buck was born March 17, 1884 in Gainesville, Texas to Howard Dewitt and Ada J. Sites Buck.  By the time Frank was a teenager, his parents had moved to Dallas, Texas.  He attended school through the seventh grade and was not considered to be a particularly good student, perhaps because he had many other varied interests.  As a young adult he held a number of different jobs, including working as a cowboy.  He also is said to have traveled as a hobo for a while.  Buck moved to Chicago and began working at a hotel around 1900.  There he met and married his first wife, Lillie West, some 29 years his senior.

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Posted by on October 10, 2019 in biography

 

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Doc Goodnight and the Goodnight Gang

The Goodnight Gang was a name given to a group of outlaws operating in East and Central Texas headed up by William E. “Doc” Goodnight.  Members of the group included Goodnight, Hugh Merrick, J. R. Willis and J. H. Johnson according to various newspaper accounts.  They were by reputation robbers and the crimes mostly attributed to them involved the theft of cash from local individuals.  There was a legend that William E. Goodnight was somehow related to rancher Charles Goodnight of North Texas, but we can find no obvious connection after looking into Charles Goodnight’s extended family.  Perhaps coincidentally, Charles Goodnight had a number of relatives in Illinois and the State of Illinois appears to also figure into Doc Goodnight’s early history.

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Posted by on October 3, 2019 in outlaws and crimes, unsolved mystery

 

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Lt. Col. William E. Dyess

Lt. Col. William Edward “Ed” Dyess was born August 9, 1916 to Richard T. Dyess, a judge, and Hallie Graham-Dyess in Albany, Texas.  Dyess grew up working on the family farm and also held a number of odd jobs.  He was a Boy Scout, but had trouble attending meetings while he was also working.  The story is told of him that one week, a carnival had performed in Albany about the same time as he brought home a poor report card from school.  He is said to have told his parents that it was all right, he was going to join the carnival anyway when he got older.

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Posted by on September 26, 2019 in aviation, biography, world war 2

 

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Why Are The Karankawa Indians Remembered as Savage Cannibals?

By Tim Seiter

In 1767, Fray Gaspar José de Solís toured the faltering missions of Texas. When he visited the mission of Nuestra Señora del Rosario, which the Spanish built to convert the Karankawa Indians to Christianity, he wrote a lengthy report on their cannibalism in his journal: “Dancing and leaping and with sharp knives in their hands, they draw near to the victim, cut off a piece of their flesh, come to the fire and half roast it, and, within sight of the victim himself devour it most ravenously.”[1] Despite captivating readers for generations, Padre Solís’s account of the Karankawas’ cannibalism has a major problem—it is almost certainly fictitious. Although the Karankawas did, in fact, practice a rare exo-cannibalism, this disgruntled priest likely fabricated an exaggerated version of the custom. He has tarnished the image of the Karankawas for the past two-hundred and fifty years. This article explains why Fray Solis’s account, a source utilized by numerous scholars, should be used selectively and with caution.

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Posted by on September 24, 2019 in tribes and tribal leaders

 

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