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Tag Archives: history

July 4, 1946

World War II had gripped the country for the better part of the last five years.  This was the first peacetime July Fourth celebration in many years and for some cities, the first celebration of any kind since 1940 or 1941.  Around the state, newspapers reported how it was observed:

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Posted by on July 4, 2019 in world war 2

 

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The Horrell Brothers

In the latter half of the 1870s in Lampasas County, Texas a feud developed between two families, the Horrells and the Higgins.  Prior to that, the Horrell brothers, Mart, Tom, Merritt, Ben and Sam, had come to the attention of state law enforcement officers.  In early 1873, during a short period when the Texas Rangers had been disbanded by the federal government, the Horrells were involved in a several incidents.  In place of the former Texas Ranger force, reconstruction Governor Edmund J. Davis promoted a state police force around 1870 to be positioned in authority over all state-wide and local law enforcement.  This was on the heels of the end of the Civil War and the emphasis was to be inclusive of non-white lawmen when selecting officers, though some whites were also hired.  This led to race-related conflicts between the officers and the general population in addition to natural conflicts with criminal elements.  The Texas Rangers would later be reinstated in mid 1873.

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Posted by on July 4, 2019 in outlaws and crimes

 

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Sarah Horton Cockrell

Sarah Horton was born in Virginia on 13 January 1819 to Enoch and Martha Stinson Horton.  She moved with her family to Dallas County, Texas near Eagle Ford in 1844, becoming one of the pioneer families in the area.  In September of 1847, she married Alexander Cockrell.

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Posted by on June 27, 2019 in biography, texas women

 

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Texas Central Railroad

Houston-Texas-Central_1906_Official-Guide(Image credit, ttarchive.com)

The railroad that later became the Houston and Texas Central Railway dates back to 1848.  It was originally called the Galveston and Red River Railroad.  A charter was granted to Ebenezer Allen to build a line from Galveston north to the Red River.  Construction started a few years later and by early 1856 the first two miles of the line had been completed.  The name change to the Houston and Texas Central was effected in the fall of 1856 when the company was reorganized.

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Posted by on June 20, 2019 in railroad

 

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The “Twin Sisters” and Dr. Henry North Graves

800px-Twin_Sisters,_San_Jacinto

“Twin Sister” replicas at San Jacinto Battleground (image in public domain)

The “Twin Sisters” refers to two field pieces (artillery pieces) donated by ladies of Cincinnati, Ohio to the cause of the Texas Revolution.  According to an article in the Austin American-Statesman from 1874, they were two identical six pound rifle cannon that were built by a Mr. Tatum at a foundry in Cincinnati and shipped by riverboat to Texas.  They were delivered in person by Mr. Tatum himself in time to be used by General Sam Houston in the Battle of San Jacinto.  Following the Revolution they became prized relics and were known to have been fired at ceremonial occasions including the fifth anniversary of the Battle of San Jacinto and the inauguration of Gen. Houston as President of the Republic of Texas.

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Buddy Holly

Buddy Holly was born Charles Hardin Holley to Lawrence Odell and Ella Pauline Drake Holley on September 7, 1939 in Lubbock, Texas.  He began to perform in the country music genre in Lubbock at high school dances.  He had won a singing contest at age five but got his first guitar when he was fourteen.  Buddy and a former junior high school friend named Bob Montgomery formed a duo they called Buddy and Bob and played anywhere they could get a foothold.  They also were the opening act when other artists would tour the area and two different times, they opened for Elvis Presley in 1955 and one time the same year for Bill Haley and the Comets (“Rock Around the Clock”).  Buddy and some high school friends then formed a group they called Buddy Holly and the Crickets and were known around Lubbock for playing dances and also spots on local radio.  The Crickets were Jerry Allison on drums, Joe Mauldin and Nicky Sullivan on guitars.  Buddy did the lead singing.

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Posted by on June 6, 2019 in biography, entertainers

 

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Governor Beauford H. Jester

beaufordjester_lrltexasgov

(Image credit: lrl.texas.gov, the Legislative Reference Library)

Governor Beauford Halbert Jester was born in Corsicana, Texas on January 12, 1893.  His parents were George Taylor and Francis Paine Gordon Jester.  His father George Jester had served as Lieutenant Governor of Texas under Governor Charles Allen Culberson.  Beauford was also descended from the Hampton McKinney family, thought to be the earliest settlers in Corsicana in the 1840s, as his great grandfather was Hampton McKinney and his grandmother was Diadema McKinney, the daughter of Hampton McKinney.  Beauford graduated from Corsicana High School in 1911 and University of Texas in Austin in 1916.  He had attended Harvard Law School for around two years but enlisted in the United States Army when the U. S. entered World War I in 1917.  He was only a month or so from being eligible to graduate when he enlisted.

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Posted by on May 30, 2019 in biography, governor

 

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